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Now available from US and EU production sites.

NOD Background

  • Model #
  • Genotype
  • Nomenclature
  • HSCFTL-13395-F
    sp/sp;ko/ko;tg/wt
    NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Sug Tg(SV40/HTLV-IL3,CSF2)10-7Jic/JicTac
  • HSCCB-13395-F
    sp/sp;ko/ko;tg/wt
    NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Sug Tg(SV40/HTLV-IL3,CSF2)10-7Jic/JicTac
  • Super immunodeficient NOG mouse expressing human GM-CSF and human IL-3 cytokines to support myeloid lineage engraftment
  • Higher overall engraftment levels of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) compared to core NOG mouse
  • Higher levels of myeloid cell differentiation following human HSC engraftment compared to core NOG mouse
  • Model of human allergy response
  • Applications in research involving cancer, infectious disease, immunology, regenerative medicine and humanization
Orders by weight: Taconic cannot accept orders by weight for this model. Please note that shipments may contain animals with a larger weight variation.

Related Taconic InsightRead the Related Taconic Biosciences' Insight:

Origin:

hGM-CSF/hIL3 NOG mice engrafted with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) stably develop extensive cell lineages as early as 6 to 8weeks post-injection. Both myeloid and lymphoid lineage cells are present in peripheral blood, bone marrow, thymus and spleen and non-lymphoid tissue including lung and liver. Longer term studies are possible in huNOG-EXL mice, with literature reports of stable engraftment and hematopoiesis for at least 20 weeks post engraftment. While, not all human immune cell types have been exhaustively characterized in these mice, extensive myeloid differentiation including granulocyte differentiation (basophil, neutrophil and mast cells) are evident in blood and tissues. Antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages) are also increased in frequency, both in blood and spleen.

Availability:

Taconic maintains an inventory of female huNOG-EXL mice engrafted as juveniles and FACS tested at 10 weeks post-engraftment; in order to ship, all mice must be ≥25% hCD45+ in peripheral blood, but in most cases huNOG-EXL mice average> 40% human cells in blood. Custom options for huNOG-EXL generation are available, such as HLA selection and time of QC and delivery post-engraftment with additional fee.

Color:

Albino

Species:

Mouse

Initial Publication:

  • Ito M, Hiramatsu H, Kobayashi K, Suzue K, Kawahata M, Hioki K, Ueyama Y, Koyanagi Y, Sugamura K, Tsuji K, Heike T, Nakahata T. (2002) NOD/SCID/γnull/c mouse: an excellent recipient mouse model for engraftment of human cells. Blood 100(9):3175-3182.
  • Fukuchi Y, Miyakawa Y, Kobayashi K, Kuramochi T, Shimamura K, Tamaoki N, Nomura T, Ueyama Y, Ito M. (1998) Cytokine dependent growth of human TF-1 leukemic cell line in human GM-CSF and IL-3 producing transgenic SCID mice. Leuk Res 22(9):837-43.
  • Ito R, Takahashi T, Katano I, Kawai K, Kamisako T, Ogura T, Ida-Tanaka M, Suemizu H, Nunomura S, Ra C, Mori A, Aiso S, Ito M. (2013) Establishment of a human allergy model using human IL-3/GM-CSF-transgenic NOG mice. J Immunol.191(6):2890-9.


Nonprofit users (excluding users at nonprofit foundations which are affiliated with a for-profit entity): For internal research purposes, the CIEA NOG mouse® Conditions of Use for nonprofit users apply. If you wish to perform sponsored research or fee-for-service contract research using the CIEA NOG mouse®, please inquire for access conditions

For-profit users and users at foundations which are affiliated with for-profit entities: The CIEA NOG mouse® Conditions of Use for for-profit users apply.

The CIEA NOG mouse® is produced and distributed under license rights to the following patents and trademarks:
  • Japanese Patent No. 3,753,321
  • US Patent No. 7,145,055; 5,464,764; 5,487,992; 5,627,059; 5,631,153; 5,789,215; 6,204,061; 6,653,113; 6,689,610
    EP Patent No. 1,338,198
  • Japanese Trademark Reg. No. 4,823,423
  • US Trademark Reg. No. 3,118,040
  • EU Trademark Reg. No. 3,736,758

Conditions of Use specific to models generated using CRISPR/Cas9
This Model was generated using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Taconic uses CRISPR/Cas9 technology to generate and/or distribute gene-edited models under licenses from The Broad Institute, Inc., the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the President and Fellows of Harvard College, the University of Iowa Research Foundation and ERS Genomics. View the full list of licensed patents:
  • This Model and biological materials derived from it may only be used for purchasers' internal research purposes in the Field, unless purchaser otherwise has rights from the Broad covering such use. "Field" means use as a research tool for research purposes, and expressly excludes any (a) clinical use, (b) human, veterinary, livestock or agricultural use, or (c) manufacture, distribution, sale, promotion, use or other exploitation as a testing service, therapeutic or diagnostic for humans or animals.
  • The Models and biological materials derived from them will not be sold or used to perform services for third parties (unless purchaser is acting on behalf of a third party to which they have communicated these Conditions of Use and which third party has accepted these Conditions of Use), or otherwise used for commercial purposes.
  • Purchasers will only use the Models and biological materials derived from them in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations, including applicable human health and animal welfare laws and regulations.
  • Each non-profit purchaser agrees that it, and not Taconic's licensors, shall be responsible for any liability, damage, loss or expense arising out of or related to purchaser's use of the purchased Models and any biological materials derived from them , including any breach of the Label License "Conditions of Use for Taconic Transgenic Models" by purchaser.
  • Each for-profit purchaser further agrees that it shall indemnify, defend and hold harmless Taconic's licensors against any liability, damage, loss, or expense (including without limitation reasonable attorneys' fees and expenses) incurred by or imposed upon any of Taconic's licensors in connection with any claims, suits, investigations, actions, demands or judgments arising out of or related to purchaser's use of the purchased Models and any biological materials derived from them.
  • Each purchaser acknowledges that the purchased Models and any biological materials derived from them and its use may be the subject of one or more issued patents and/or pending patent applications owned by Taconic's licensors, and the purchase of the Models does not convey a license under any claims in the foregoing patents or patent applications.

Enhanced Myeloid Engraftment in Humanized NOG-EXL Mice

Stable engraftment with significant improvement in myeloid lineage reconstitution and overall cellularity

Stable engraftment with significant improvement in myeloid lineage reconstitution and overall cellularity
Figure 1: (a) High humanization rate is observed across multiple donors in huNOG-EXL. NOG-EXL (hGM-CSF/hIL-3 NOG) mice were engrafted with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from n=11 different donors and peripheral blood humanizations was monitored by hCD45 antibody. (b) huNOG-EXL mouse supports development of both myeloid and lymphoid cells.

Better engraftment of myeloid populations in huNOG-EXL mice

Better engraftment of myeloid populations in huNOG-EXL mice
Figure 2: Frequencies of CD14+ CD16 (classical) monocytes from FSC-Ahi CD3 cells (a), HLA-DR+ Lin 1 cells from CD45+ cells (b), CD11c CD123+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells (c), and CD11c+ CD123 myeloid dendritic cells (d), the latter from HLA-DR+ Lin 1 cells, in blood (diamonds) and secondary lymphoid organs (SLO; spleen: circles; axillary lymph node: squares; mesenteric lymph node: triangles) from huNOG-EXL and huNSG mice. NS: Not statistically significant. Adapted from Perdomo-celis, et al. 2019 under Creative Commons Attribution License.

Human immune cell subsets in huNOG-EXL mice

Human immune cell subsets in huNOG-EXL mice
Figure 3: Representative gating strategy from blood cells for the identification of the cell populations evaluated. The number next to the gates represents the respective cell subset found in the adjacent table. Adapted from Perdomo-celis, et al. 2019 under Creative Commons Attribution License.

Tumor Xenograft Models and Immunotherapy Research with huNOG-EXL

Durable anti-tumor response to combination therapy in huNOG-EXL BRCA-deficient tumor model

Durable anti-tumor response to combination therapy in huNOG-EXL BRCA-deficient tumor model
Figure 4: (a) Tumor growth curve for the MDA-MB-436 NOG-EXL humanized model treated with control or 35 mg/kg niraparib daily for 5 days on and 2 days off for 4 weeks (QD × 5 × 4). (b) Significantly upregulated genes identified with a two-sample t test (p <=0.05, fold change>=1.5) were subjected to enrichment analysis of pathway gene sets and demonstrated a significant enrichment of interferon gamma signature and interferon alpha signature genes in niraparib-treated samples. (c-e) Niraparib promoted tumor immune cell infiltration in BRCA-deficient MDA-MB-436 huNOG-EXL humanized tumor model. (f) Tumor growth in the BRCA-deficient MDA-MB-436 model in huNOG-EXL mice treated with 200 mg anti-PD-1 (pembrolizumab) on days 0, 4, 9, 13, 18, 22, and 28; 35 mg/kg niraparib daily for 5 days on and 2 days off for 4 weeks; and the combination of these agents. Adapted from Wang, et al. 2019 under Creative Commons Attribution License.

Immunophenotyping and anti-CTLA4 human immune response in huNOG-EXL mice

Immunophenotyping and anti-CTLA4 human immune response in huNOG-EXL mice
Figure 5: (a) Anti-CTLA4 antibody pharmacokinetics in huNOG-EXL mice. (b) Splenic immunophenotyping of huNOG-EXL mice treated with anti-CLTA4 antibodies. NF: nonfucosylated. Data provided by Dr. Kathryn Fraser, Takeda.

Infectious Disease Research with huNOG-EXL

HIV infection in huNOG-EXL mice affects the frequencies of human immune cells

HIV infection in huNOG-EXL mice affects the frequencies of human immune cells
Figure 6: Frequencies of CD3+ cells (a), CD20+ cells (b), CXCR5+ CD4+ T-cells (c), CXCR5+ CD8+ T-cells (d), CD14+ CD16− (classical) monocytes from FSC-Ahi CD3− cells (e), HLA-DR+ Lin 1− cells from CD45+ cells (f), CD11c− CD123+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells from HLA-DR+ Lin 1− cells (g), CD56dim (h), and CD56bright NK cells (i) in huNOG-EXL mice after infection with HIV. Adapted from Perdomo-celis, et al. 2019 under Creative Commons Attribution License.