Inflammation INSIGHTS

BALB/c Il10 Knockout Mice are Useful Tools for IBD and Colitis Research

photo from BALB/<span style='text-transform: lowercase;'>c</span> I<span style='text-transform: lowercase;'>l</span>10 Knockout Mice are Useful Tools for IBD and Colitis Research

Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors are a promising recent addition to the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) armamentarium. Tofacitinib, a small molecule pan-JAK inhibitor, received FDA approval in 2018 for the treatment of adult patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis1. Tofacitinib is non-selective and inhibits all four JAK isoforms (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, TYK2), and research is currently underway to determine if isoform- or tissue-specific JAK inhibition could offer better efficacy...  Read More

A Guide to Monitoring NASH Progression in Diet-Induced Mouse Disease Models

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Numerous diet-based models have been developed to induce nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH) in mice. Chronic consumption of high-energy feeds enriched with fat causes steatotic buildup, lipotoxic inflammation, hepatic dysfunction, and liver fibrosis. Next generation diets1 include fructose and cholesterol as accelerants toward the diseased liver state. A key challenge to using diet-induced NASH mice for preclinical research involves selection and quantification of disease endpoints....  Read More

Webinar Q&A — Genetically Engineered Mouse Colitis Models for Preclinical Drug Development

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Dr. Philip Dubé of Taconic Biosciences presented a recent webinar on genetically engineered models (GEMs) of colitis, which are widely used for preclinical research on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although a wide array of GEM colitis models exist, Dr. Dubé focused on a few models which are both most commonly used and most useful for drug discovery. He discussed the relevance of the disease mechanism in each...  Read More

Planning for Success with NASH mice: proper care and acclimation

photo from Planning for Success with NASH mice: proper care and acclimation

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, also known as NASH, is categorized by liver inflammation and fibrosis due to a buildup of fat in the liver. It represents a more severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which currently has no approved pharmaceutical treatment. There are various types of mouse models used to study NASH, including diet-induced (both high fat and nutrient-deficient diets), chemically-induced, and genetic models. Of these, high...  Read More

Taconic Biosciences Learn at Home Series: Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

photo from Taconic Biosciences Learn at Home Series: Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

With many researchers and laboratory animal professionals under orders to remain at home to limit the spread of coronavirus, we know you may have a bit more time on your hands than usual. To help keep you engaged while working from home, Taconic Biosciences has pulled together a series of educational materials organized around different therapeutic areas. This is the second track in our series. Learn at...  Read More

The Translational Relevance of IBD Mouse Models

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Many animal models have been developed to study inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and they remain in general use for screening of potential new therapies. But a recent review article questions the relevance of many of these models, citing evidence that they may not accurately predict therapeutic response in patients. Background: Types of Rodent Colitis Models Colitis models are commonly grouped into three categories: Chemically-induced colitis: Chemicals such...  Read More

Webinar Q&A — Validated Il10 Knockout Models for IBD Research

photo from Webinar Q&A — Validated Il10 Knockout Models for IBD Research

Dr. Philip Dubé recently presented a webinar on validated Il10 knockout mouse models for IBD research. He gave an overview of research in this area and presented new data on these models from studies done by Boehringer Ingelheim and Incyte. Due to time constraints, many of the questions submitted during the webinar went unanswered. We present a full Q&A here. Characterization of Il10 Knockouts Dr. Philip Dubé:...  Read More

Modeling Inflammatory Diseases with NOD2 Knockout Mice

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How the Mucosal Barrier Maintains Homeostasis The mucosal barrier lining the digestive tract is not homogenous and consists of three main components1: An intestinal epithelium, physically separating external environment from the deeper tissues of the body, which contains seven cell types, including stem cells required for epithelial renewal, and some immune cells A mucus layer, composed of mucins and antimicrobial peptides, which forms a protective layer over...  Read More

IBD Severity and Fungi in Microbiome

photo from IBD Severity and Fungi in Microbiome

The microbiome includes not just bacteria, but also fungi, viruses and parasites. While most of the attention has been on bacterial components of the microbiome, new research links a commensal yeast found on human skin to disease severity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Linking Common Fungi with IBD Severity In a new paper published in Cell Host & Microbe, Limon et al. examined commensal fungi associated with...  Read More

Summary of colitis mouse models in IBD research

photo from Summary of colitis mouse models in IBD research

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) arise from a convergence of underlying genetic susceptibility, immune system dysfunction, environmental factors, and shifts in gut microbiota. Due to the multifactorial feature of these diseases, different animal models have been utilized to investigate the underlying mechanisms and develop potential therapeutic strategies. Colitis Animal Models In the table below, we summarize commonly used colitis mouse models and provide key features and tips for...  Read More

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